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Marvik Nikolayevich Ribabov
Timeline: History of Margovya

MarvikRibabov
Ribabov in 1971

Birth: 18 January 1943
Polpovich, Del Quiev del Sur, Margovya
Death: 18 August 1972 (aged 29)
Ciudad del Celebridad, Dostalinsky, Margovya
Spouse: None
Religion: Roman Catholic
Profession: Actor, Comedian, Model

Marvik Nikolayevich Ribabov (18 January 1943 - 18 August 1972) was a Margovyan actor, comedian and model. He rose to fame during the 1960's, starring in the hit TV series The Roaring Twenties, alongside Genrikh Antonov, Yulian Markovsky and Vasily Borisov. Ribabov was also better known as the on-screen partner of Svetlana Elemat, which was dubbed the greatest on-screen relationship in Margovyan History.

Ribabov's career soared higher as he became part of the hit TV series The Interceptors in 1969, where he played the role of Capt. Mikhail Kurotovsky, the very first Interceptor of the series, and starred in the film version of the Roaring Twenties in 1971. However, Ribabov died in a traffic collision in Ciudad del Celebridad, Dostalinsky on August 18, 1972 at the age of 29. He was posthumously awarded the Margovyan National Artist Award in 1974, was included in the Actors' Hall of Fame in 1975, and is considered the greatest Margovyan actor to date.

BiographyEdit

Birth and Early LifeEdit

Marvik Ribabov was born in Polpovich, del Quiev del Sur on January 18, 1948 to farmer Nikolai Ribabov (June 8, 1912 - September 22, 1993) and schoolteacher Emilya Oriondovich-Ribabova (born April 19, 1923). Marvik has four younger brothers, Andrey (born May 15, 1946), Oleg (born August 17, 1950), Kiril (July 24, 1953 - February 1, 1992) and Pyotr (born January 10, 1959). Ribabov finished his secondary education in Del Quiev del Sur State University in 1962, after which he refused to enter college and focused more on his acting career.

Acting CareerEdit

Early Career (1947-1963)Edit

Ribabov was first discovered in early 1947 when he was paid to star in a Coca-Cola commercial at age four. Ribabov was very amused by what actors do in these kind of projects, that he wanted to be an actor in the future. He starred in more commercials from 1947 to 1954, and got his first acting break as the young Guillermo Salud in the 1952 Mexican-Margovyan collaboration film Judas Went to Heaven at the age of 9, after which he starred in more movies in the 1950's, starring either as a young character or a younger version of one of the main characters. In 1959, he tried for the role of Kiril Granadanov on the movie Underground on Wheels, but eventually lost to future television co-star Gleb Maryanov.

Nevertheless, he starred in a historical sitcom The Roaring Twenties alongside Vasily Borisov, Boris Antayov and Yulian Markovsky from 1962 to 1968, while doing side projects during the show's run.

From 1960, Ribabov starred in more movies, and he was later called a "rising star" because of his above average performances in films. On 1961, at the age of eighteen, Ribabov was finally cast in Underground on Wheels II as Lavrenty Granadanov, who resorted to illegitimate racing to avenge his brother Kiril's (whose role was given to Gleb Maryanov in 1960) death. This gave the film a big boost by its release in 1962 due to what were percieved by critics as an amazing performance by Ribabov. Because of that, Ribabov was never replaced again, as he carried on the role in the succeeding Underground on Wheels movies.

Adult Film Career Beginnings (1963-1965)Edit

On 1963, Ribabov was cast in the film Breakfast in Bed, his first adult film role, at the age of twenty, opposite Irina Balkonovich. His success in the film led him to more pornographic film roles, such as Kid on the Loose (1963), On the Wings of My Balls (1964), I Like Your Sh*t (1964), and Love is Made, Not Felt (1965), and later on, he was known for his extraordinarily large "vegetables", and was eventually partnered to the late independent film star Kseniya Atkinova, who was known for her large "hole" in the 1965 adult film Shoot that Ball, which was considered the greatest adult film of the 1960's.

On late-1965, Ribabov landed on another role in the action-romance film The Wild West, alongside then-upcoming actress Svetlana Petrova (later Elemat). Judging by their make out scenes, and action scenes in the film, such as when Ribabov carried Petrova in his arms whilst jumping from train to train, and when he hid Petrova among the pedals of his car while escaping from the antagonists, film critics concluded that the Ribabov-Petrova on-screen relationship will sell better on later films.

On-screen Affairs with Svetlana Petrova (1965-1969)Edit

Just as critics predicted, the on-screen affair of Ribabov and Petrova was critically acclaimed in later films, such as In My Dreams (1965), Mr. Batalyanov, I Presume (1966), Vlad's Testimony (1966), I'm Yours Forever and Always (1967), You Complete Me (1968), and Come Back and Let Love Happen (1969), and they were considered the greatest love team in Margovyan film history.

Aside from roles opposite Svetlana Petrova, Ribabov starred in several more adult film roles, which include One More Try (1966), Good Thing It Wasn't My Ex (1967), Sixty-Nine Trips to Paradise (1968), Cucumber and Cabbage (1969), and Lie Still, You're Rocking the Bed (1969). His performance in this movie roles earned him more recognition, awards, and another acting opportunity that will rise him further to stardom.

The Inteceptors and Later Career (1969-1972)Edit

In 1969, at the age of twenty-six, Ribabov took the role of Capt. Mikhail Kurotovsky, the first "Interceptor" in the hit TV police sitcom The Interceptors, which would later prove as his biggest break as an actor. His outstanding performance in the show as the leader of an operations unit called the Task Force Interceptors in the Arbatskaya City Police Department earned him the Prime-time Emmy Award for "Best Actor" in 1970, 1971, 1972, and, posthumously, in 1973 and 1974. On 1970, he was formally dubbed as "The Ultimate Rising Star of Margovya" as he takes on more film roles, including Sixty-Nine Ways to Achieve a Good Erection (1970), Seventeen at Seventy (1970), Honey, May I? (1970) and Love You Like a Private Part (1971).

On 1971, he reprised his role as Timofey Manlaev in The Roaring Twenties: The Movie, the film released following the eponymous series' finale in 1968. This film role earned him the 44th Academy Awards for Best Actor in 1972. During his final year, Ribabov took on his last batch of film roles, which proved to be one of his best film roles in his entire acting career. Some of it include Sorry, Wrong Number (1971), Hang Under (1972) and Six Times the Fun (1972).

Personal LifeEdit

Ribabov, being an actor and all, became the breadwinner of his family, as his mother got fired from her job as a schoolteacher in 1961, and his father retired from farming in 1964. Marvik also took over his family's farming business in 1965, and started another family business on car manufacturing, the Ribabov Motors, Inc., which remains active to this day. Though known for taking numerous women to bed, Ribabov only had Svetlana Petrova as an official girlfriend, starting as a simple on-screen partner in the mid-1960's, until they became an off-screen couple in 1967. As an official couple, Ribabov and Petrova, according to film critics, performed better in their films after 1967.

On November 21, 1971, after four years of relationship, Ribabov reportedly proposed to Petrova in a famous cafeteria in Oriondovich, Pontival, and they became engaged, their wedding supposedly set on August 6, 1972. However, on August 5, the day before, Ribabov and Petrova called off the wedding, with numerous rumors about the cause of their break-up spreading across the country, including the idea that there was a third party between their relationship, who were rumored to have been either of Robert Elemat, Genrikh Antonov, Anatoly Baychenko or Vasily Borisov. On August 14, four days shy of his death, Ribabov answered all controversies brought about his break-up with Petrova, up to and including the rumor that he is suffering from extreme depression, to which he replied in the negative. Petrova, on the other hand, refused to say anything about the break-up, as she didn't want to make things more complicated.

DeathEdit

RibabovAccidentSite

Ribabov's M57 being consumed by flames, close-up shot along 7th Avenue in Ciudad del Celebridad, Dostalinsky, August 18, 1972

On August 18, 1972 at exactly 11:43 PM, MST (Margovyan Standard Time), police officers on duty in downtown Ciudad del Celebridad, Dostalinsky heard an explosion somewhere between 6th and 7th Avenue. As they arrive at the scene, they saw a large fuel tanker and a Yakovich M57 sports car, both being consumed by flames. After a few minutes, firemen arrived at the scene and extinguished the fire. The cops searched in both vehicles for victims, and they were surprised at what they found in the M57: "a man that looked exactly like Marvik Ribabov". The body is still untouched by flames, but the face is covered with blood, making the victim unrecognizable to the cops. The cops then searched the man's wallet for any identification document (e.g., driver's license, passport) and found out that it really was Ribabov. Police officers and several passers-by rushed Ribabov to Dostalinsky State Hospital, but he was declared dead on arrival. He was twenty-nine years old.

Later that day, most of the actors who are close friends of Ribabov came rushing to DSH to confirm if Ribabov has really passed, and after finding out it was true, Yulian Markovsky, one of Ribabov's closest friends, made a formal announcement on national television on the morning of August 19, 1972, through the morning show Mornings with MNBN: "I regret to inform everyone that Mr. Marvik Ribabov has just passed away last night, 18th of August, 1972, at exactly 11:43 PM, from traffic collision at a young age of twenty-nine. To his family, friends and fans, may you all have strength to get over his loss".

Ribabov's wake was held in front of his house, at Polpovich, del Quiev del Sur. The wake was held for about two weeks to give all celebrities nationwide (and some artists outside the country) to pay their respects to the former actor. A final mass for Ribabov was held on September 5, 1972 by then-Ikulsk Archbishop Baldomero Cortes, OP, and his remains were buried in Cemeterio del Celebridad in Ciudad del Celebridad, Dostalinsky on September 6, 1972.

AftermathEdit

On August 20, 1972, before the public wake was started, an autopsy of Ribabov's body was conducted by the investigators, with consent of the actor's family. During the autopsy, an estimated 32.20% of alcohol content was recorded in Ribabov's one-liter blood sample, hinting that he might have taken at least twenty glasses of vodka (assuming each glass contains 330 mL of beverage, and that vodka has an alcohol content of 40%) before driving that night. After Ribabov's funeral was held in September 6, both the police and the media started investigating on the circumstances leading to the untimely demise of the actor.

According to an undisclosed source, Ribabov was last seen in the famous Rock-a-beer Baby bar in Remontadov, Viktoriyovskaya in the evening of August 18, 1972 with The Interceptors co-stars Vasily Borisov, Boris Antayov, and Gleb Maryanov after he was done with the filming of what would turn out to be his final film, Came for You. At first Ribabov was at his normal state, as quoted by a witness, "just talking to his friends probably about the film or The Interceptors", but just about a couple of minutes later, Ribabov started having an emotional breakdown whilst drinking a massive amount of vodka, and yelling at his friends and at the bar's workers. About 11:05 PM, Ribabov had reportedly left the bar, took his car and drove as fast as he can.

About 11:41 PM, thirty-six minutes after he left Remontadov, Ribabov's Yakovich M57 was seen along Poliotovsky Street near 10th Avenue in Ciudad del Celebridad, Dostalinsky, going at about 241 kph, three times the speed limit in the area, which is 85 kph. However, according to the witnesses, they didn't recognize the car as Ribabov's by that time; they only found out right after the police investigated his identity.

Posthumous projects and legacyEdit

Ribabov had four more finished but unreleased movies by the time he died in 1972. His last three movie participations, Gavril in the House, Years Back and Came For You, was released in 1973 and 1974, with one more film unreleased, the Underground on Wheels VII, which was held back since it finished production in 1971. Since Ribabov was slated to come back for an eighth movie after its supposed release on January 1973, the producers of the movie had to make some changes to seem like this was going to be the very last Underground on Wheels movie. Production finished in mid-1973, but the producers waited until all unreleased movies by Ribabov had been released. It was then finally released in theaters on January 18, 1975, Ribabov's 32nd birth anniversary, where it garnered a box office income of m783 million, making it the biggest box office success of the 1970's.

Awards and RecognitionEdit

FilmographyEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1952 Judas Went to Heaven Young Guillermo Salud First motion picture project
1954 The Fifth Dimension young Gavril Quarimov
1956 Rest In Peace Andrey Lubovenko
1958 Pie For Breakfast Yakov Oligovsky Nomainated "Best Teen Actor", 1958 Margovya-rama Awards
1959 Lame Stuff Mikhail Pavlov
Made in China Isay Androvich Won "Best Teen Actor", 1st MNBN Actors' Awards
1960 Dogs Gone Wild Flynn Voice Role
1962 Underground on Wheels II Lavrenty Granadanov Won "Best Upcoming Actor", 1962 Honorary Awards For Movies
1963 Underground on Wheels III Lavrenty Granadanov
  • Won "Best Actor", 1963 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", 5th MNBN Actors' Awards
Breakfast in Bed Andrey Ulyanovsky First Adult Film Role
Kid on the Loose Ilya Pornovich
1964 University Life Marvik Ilgamov Won "Best Actor", 1964 Margovya-rama Awards
Underground on Wheels IV Lavrenty Granadanov Won "Best Actor", 6th MNBN Actors' Awards
On the Wings of My Balls Mark Dopov
I Like Your Sh*t Pavel Tramuv
  • Won "Most Daring Role", 1965 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Actor of the Year", Margovya's Pick magazine awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1964 Latin-American Film Festival
1965 Love is Made, Not Felt Andrey Taltalonev
Shoot That Ball Gregoriy Maryanov
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1965 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", 7th MNBN Actors' Awards
The Wild West Kid Tramuv
  • First Film with Svetlana Petrova (Elemat)
  • Won "Best Actor", Leonid Pankavuranov Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1965 Margovya-rama Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1965 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Nominated "Best Actor", 38th Academy Awards
In My Dreams Maksim Masonovsky
1966 Sex in Mind VII Boyfriend # 7: "Pyotr"
One More Try Karl Simonsky
Vlad's Testimony Vladimir Yakubov
Mr. Batalyanov, I Presume Aleksei Batalyanov
  • Won "Best Main Antagonist", 1967 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 8th MNBN Actors' Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Leonid Pankavuranov Film Awards
  • Won "Best Male Antagonist", Leonid Pankavuranov Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1966 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Antagonist", 1966 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Most Promising Actor", Margovya's Pick Magazine Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1966 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Antagonist", 1966 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor", 39th Academy Awards
1967 I'm Yours Forever and Always Vladislav Pranenko
Good Thing It Wasn't My Ex Mikhail Chubovsky
  • Won "Best Supporting Actor", 1967 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Supporting Actor", 1967 Honorary Awards For Movies
Underground on Wheels V Lavrenty Granadanov
  • Won "Best Actor", 1967 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", 1968 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Action Star", 1968 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Most Dangerous Act", 1968 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1967 Margovya-rama Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 9th MNBN Actors' Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Leonid Pankavuranov Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor Under Action", 1967 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Most Promising Act", Margovya's Pick Magazine Awards
  • Won "Actor of the Year", Margovya's Pick Magazine Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1967 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best actor", 40th Academy Awards
1968 You Complete Me Andrey Yakovich
Sex in Mind IX Himself Brief cameo appearance
Sixty-Nine Trips to Paradise Kiril Makarov Won "Most Daring Role", 1969 Creative Film Awards
Underground on Wheels VI Lavrenty Granadanov
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1969 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Action Star", 1968 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", 1968 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", Leonod Pankavuranov Film Awards
  • Won "Actor of the Year", Margovya's Pick Magazine Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1968 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor", 41st Academy Awards
1969 Lie Still, You're Rocking the Bed Oleg Chudovsky
Cucumber and Cabbage Yulian Masonovsky
Come Back and Let Love Happen Venyamin Aldovich
  • Won "Best Actor", 1969 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor Under Adult Film", 1969 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Nominated "Best Actor", 1969 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Nominated "Best Actor", 42nd Academy Awards
1970 Sixty-Nine Ways to Achieve a Good Erection Lev Rabatsky
  • Won "Best Actor", 1970 Margovya-rama Awards
  • Won "Best Actor Under Adult Film, 1970 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor", 1970 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Nominated "Best Actor", 43rd Academy Awards
Seventeen at Seventy Marvik Maryanov
Honey, May I? Ramon Ulyanov
  • Won "Best Actor", 1970 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", 12th MNBN Actors' Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
1971 Love You Like a Private Part Aleksei Antonov
Sorry, Wrong Number Timofey Maryanov
The Roaring Twenties: The Movie Timofey Manlaev
  • Won "Best Actor", 1971 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", 1972 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
  • Won "Most Promising Actor", 1972 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1971 Margovya-rama Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 13th MNBN Actors' Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1971 Action Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Leonid Pankavuranov Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1971 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor", 44th Academy Awards
  • Dubbed "The Ultimate Rising Star of Margovya"
1972 Hang Under Stanislav Pankavuranov
Six Times The Fun Gennady Sorbariyev
  • Last film released before death
  • Won "Best Actor", 1972 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", 1972 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor", 14th MNBN Actors' Awards
1973 Gavril in the House Gavril Urov
  • Released posthumously
  • Won "Best Actor", 1973 Honorary Awards For Movies
1974 Years Back Lavrenty Duranov Released posthumously
Came Back For You Boris Delganov
  • Released posthumously
  • Won "Best Actor", 16th MNBN Actors' Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1974 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1974 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Awarded "Margovyan National Artist Award"
1975 Underground on Wheels VII: The Last Stand Lavrenty Granadanov
  • Final film role
  • Released posthumously
  • Won "Best Actor", 1975 Honorary Awards For Movies
  • Won "Best Action Star", 1976 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1976 Creative Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Amanda Viktoriyovskaya Film and Television Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1975 Action Film Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 17th MNBN Actors' Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1975 Margovya-rama Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", Leonid Pankavuranov Awards
  • Won "Actor of the Year", Margovya's Pick Magazine Awards
  • Won "Best Actor", 1st Ciudad del Celebridad Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor", 1975 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor Under Action", 1975 Latin-American Film Festival
  • Won "Best Actor", 48th Academy Awards
  • Included in the Actors' Hall of Fame
1997 The Life of the Party none Biographical film; character portrayed by Gennady Elemat

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